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tv   CBS Overnight News  Me-TV  December 18, 2015 2:07am-4:00am CST

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wearing sunglasses in a rainstorm. in all, the feds allege shkreli lost $11 million in investors' money. his arrest was trending on social media all day, frequently followed by the hashtag "karma." scott. >> anthony mason, thank you, anthony. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth
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from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action.
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares!
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two cuban-americans debating immigration reform in the presidential campaign. ted cruz and marco rubio are battling to become the alternative to donald trump, and major garrett is on the campaign. >> reporter: in republican circles, the word "amnesty" is a weapon. ted cruz unleashed it against marco rubio at tuesday's debate. >> there was a battle over amnesty, and some chose, like senator rubio, to stand with barack obama and chuck schumer and support a massive amnesty plan. >> reporter: that's a reference to the 2013 immigration reform bill rubio helped draft. it ultimately failed, but the bill would have granted legal status to the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in america. cruz said today that's the definition of amnesty. >> i oppose amnesty. i oppose citizenship. i oppose legalization for illegal aliens. i always have. and i always will. >> he's not told the truth about
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legalization. >> reporter: rubio says cruz is forgetting the facts. cruz offered an amendment to that bill that would have provided green cards and work permits to undocumented immigrants, but deny them citizenship. >> he said at the time, and he repeated to multiple media outlets for months, that he supported legalizing people who were here illegally. >> reporter: in the crucial early state of iowa, a recent poll found 54% of gop voters wanted to deport the immigrants. iowan joel kurtinis supports cruz. >> when people hear the word "amnesty" that's an immediate yes or no for a whole lot of people. >> reporter: is that definable, amnesty? >> when you talk about allowing them to remain or turning a blind eye or winking to that, that's amnesty. >> reporter: rubio is more vulnerable on this issue than cruz because the 2013 bill also provided a path to citizenship. scott, alabama senator jeff sessions, who has guided donald trump's immigration policy said today rubio backed amnesty and cruz did not.
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major, thank you. donald trump's proposal to temporarily ban muslims entering the u.s. and the attack in san bernardino, have many of america's five million muslims defending their faith. we sat down with five muslim millennials, all born and raised right here in the united states. college student r.j. khalif. army lieutenant shahn khan. nursing student sameya omarkheil. college student taqwa brookins, and journalist noor tagouri. >> donald trump's rhetoric didn't even hit me hard until last week. i had my absolute best childhood friend, best childhood friend, since i was six years old. she lived across the street. i saw her mother as a mother. and they're white christians, and her mom on facebook posted this super hateful post about
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broke down in tears. like, i -- it was so hard for me to see. and i wrote her this long letter like, "you know us. my mom -- like, you guys know each other. i just went to your wedding last year. like i'm -- we're the muslim family that you know and you know we're not like that." >> what do you think people misunderstand about the values of islam? >> i think they believe too much that religion places an emphasis on violence. >> the koran was written in arabic, which is a deeply metaphorical language, where one word has hundreds of meanings. so if you want to define it in a violent sense, you're going to be able to defin it in a violent sense, the same way if you want to define in a peaceful sense, which 1.5 billion do, you'll be able to do so. >> but there are no verses in the koran that allow killing of innocent people under no circumstances. >> terrorism in your view is outlawed? >> it's outlawed. it's the last thing any muslim should be doing. >> when you hear of an attack like the one in paris, like the one in san bernardino, and you
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go to school the next day, what's going through your mind? >> i remember after the attacks had happened, i was-- i was terrified because i knew that we would get the backlash for what had happened to all those innocent people. confronted by somebody on the street? anybody have words with you? >> yeah. it was the monday after the paris attacks had happened, and i went to school. i was walking, and a man that was leaning against a parking meter, i was walking past him, and he stuck out his leg and he tripped me right in front of, you know, everybody. and i fell on to the floor. and then he threw down his cigarette, and he started screaming in my ear, like on the right side. he was just like, "go back to where you came from." >> he didn't mean long island? [ laughter ] >> that's what i thought he meant, you know. that's where i'm from. i've never felt hate like that before, so it was the first time for me. >> lieutenant, when you decided to join the army, was there a lot of conversation in the family about that? >> everyone that wasn't in the
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own people? this is crazy. what are you doing?" that's when i did my own research and i found out there's military. there's religious tolerance. there's respect. >> i wonder how it strikes your ear when you hear isis in particular, claiming that it's doing everything that it's doing in the name of all muslims. >> i don't understand how logically does it make sense to say that, you know, isis represents all muslims and is fighting for all muslims when they're killing the very people who they claim they represent. >> there's nothing islamic about isis. islam, it comes from the root word salam, three arabic letters that literally translates to peace. isis goes against the very tenets of it. >> to see more of this eye-opening discussion, go to cbsnews.com. you can also find us, of course, on facebook. secretary of defense ashton
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will be seeing more buildup of u.s. forces in the fight against isis. carter's interview in iraq today with charlie d'agata was his first since the secretary acknowledged using a personal e- mail account to conduct official business, which is against federal rules. >> what i did, that i shouldn't have been doing until a few months ago, was occasionally use my iphone to send administrative messages, no classified information, and backed up as records. i have to hold myself to absolutely strict standards in terms of cyber security, and doing things that are appropriate. i didn't in this case. it's a mistake. and it's entirely my own. >> reporter: we've just returned from syria. we spoke to commanders there. and they said they don't need training and equipment.
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armored vehicles. we need antitank weapons to match the firepower against isis. is that under discussion? >> yes. we've acknowledged that we're doing that, and we're doing that because they're effective fighters, and that's exact the kind of partner we're looking for. >> reporter: they suggested to us there may even be the introduction of more forces. >> absolutely. president obama wants us to accelerate the defeat of isil. so he is open to-- and i've made it clear to my commanders-- i want to get this done both in iraq and syria. >> reporter: americans might be concerned when they hear about more equipment, more involvement, more troops. >> they are going to hear about us doing more because we need to defeat isil and we need to do it quickly. so we need to enable capable and motivated local forces -- that's our strategic approach. have them with our active help. >> reporter: are you winning or is it containment? >> we'll win. i don't have any question about it, but we want to win faster,
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>> reporter: a big part of the problem is getting baghdad on board, scott. the secretary of defense failed to get the iraqi government to accept more u.s. help. it doesn't play well at home that america is doing their bidding for them. >> charlie d'agata with the news-making interview tonight. charlie, thank you. a simple test can detect an elusive and deadly cancer among women. nasa discovers celestial light sabers. and new "star wars" movie is awakening fans. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. olay regenerist renews from within, plumping surface cells for a dramatic transformation without the need for fillers your concert tee might show your age... your skin never will. olay regenerist.
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it's estimated more than 14,000 women in the u.s. will die this year from ovarian cancer, a disease that often goes undiscovered. but dr. jon lapook tells us a new test is showing promise. >> reporter: more than 21,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, usually too late to be cured. that's because early symptoms are either absent or vague. for the first time, a large study suggests there may be a way to successfully screen women for this disease and save lives. more than 200,000 women in great britain were followed for 11 years and doctors used a new strategy for screening. women were first given a series of blood tests called ca125.
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upward suspiciously, women were then given a pelvic ultrasound. this resulted in a 15% lower chance of dying from ovarian cancer. no previous strategy has been effective. this is encouraging, but the researchers caution these women will need to be followed for about another three years before it's clear whether this new method actually works. but, scott, given that right now there's really been no effective way of screening for such a deadly cancer, this is promising. >> jon lapook, thank you, doctor. coming up next, a special
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we'll be right back. a couple birthdays of note. pope francis turned 79. at the vatican children sang happy birthday in his native spanish and presented him with a cake with a single candle. also getting a birthday cake, this one made of ice, raisins, peanut butter and trail mix is coldilocks, the polar bear at the philadelphia zoo just turned 35, the oldest polar bear in the lower 48. and as if on cue today, nasa revealed an image captured by the hubble space telescope that looks a lot like a light saber from "star wars." it's actually a newborn star shooting out twin jets of super- heated gas. it is not in a galaxy far, far away, but in our own, the milky way. in a moment, a woman married to "star wars."es it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats.
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there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. while i was on a combat patrol in baqubah, iraq, a rocket-propelled grenade took my arm off at the shoulder. i was discharged from the army, and i've been working with the wounded warrior project since 2007. warriors, you don't have to be severely wounded to be with the wounded warrior project. we do have a lot of guys that have post-traumatic stress disorder. being able to share your story, i guess it kind of helps you wrap your mind around what did happen over there. my name is norbie, and yes, i do suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder,
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star wars! star wars! >> they're already in line. the new "star wars" movie opens at midnight. for some fans, "star wars" is not just a couple of hours of fantasy. it is part of their everyday reality. here's mireya villarreal. >> he's a big, fat, caterpillar. >> reporter: jennifer landa is a california-based wife and mother who loves to play with her daughter. start talking about "star wars" and it's like the force awakens. >> i think when i was younger it was definitely more of a secret, but now it's okay to be a geek. it's actually a good thing, so i wear my fandom proudly. >> reporter: there's her artwork, her costume collection, and just look at her wedding photos.
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more subtly. >> reporter: you say "subtle" but i've seen your pictures. >> this is true. that is the one thing where i always dreamed of walking in just like the movie, darth vader, with stormtroopers at my side. it was awesome. >> reporter: near san francisco, 70-year-old steve sansweet runs rancho obiwan, a nonprofit museum that, according to the "guinness book of world records" holds the largest "star wars" collection at 500,000 items that date back to the first movie in 1977. >> the politics were so dark in america, the vietnam war, the impeachment of richard nixon, the movies were dark, and here came something really fresh. >> reporter: every year, until 2020, a new "star wars" movie is set to be released. >> i think it is safe to say that "star wars" is forever. >> reporter: keeping fans like
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>> feels good, right. >> reporter: it kind of does. >> yeah! >> reporter: mireya villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us just little bit later for the morning news and of course, "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is the "cbs overnight
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news." i'm demarco morgan. president obama insists we have nothing to fear from terrorists this holiday season, but the people who run america's theme parks aren't taking any chances. the disney parks in california and florida, along with sea world and universal studios, are all ramping up security. and it includes more metal detectors, random screening of visitors and a ban on some kids wearing costumes. anna werner has more. >> reporter: white tents went up at disney world entrances today with metal detectors inside. park officials tell us visitors will be randomly selected for secondary screenings, a move major league sports and entertainment venues. disney officials said they've already added visible and nonvisible security measures, including more uniformed officers and specially trained dogs. . once inside, guests will no longer see toy guns, not even water pistols. they've been removed from disney
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parks. one official told us they want to make sure that a toy gun doesn't cause distraction or confusion for staff and security personnel. and one more change -- anyone 14 years or older will no longer be allowed to wear costumes into the parks, so security screening will be easier. the fitzhugh family of osceola, indiana drove 20 hours straight to orlando for an all-disney vacation, arriving just as the new security protocols were being put in place. >> it's sad. i mean, it's sad that things have to happen, that go on in this world anymore. >> reporter: 16-year-old clara, a high school sophomore, says the changes make her feel better about visiting the parks. >> yeah, i do think it will be safer because, i mean, you never know people's intentions. >> reporter: disney isn't the only park making these changes. universal and sea world also announced they're making similar changes. they say they want to make
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anna werner, cbs news, orlando. social media is buzzing with glee over the arrest of martin shrekli, the hedge fund manager that bought a pharmaceutical company that jacked up the price of a life-saving drug. shrekli faces up to 20 years in prison, but it's got nothing to do with price gouging. anthony mason reports. >> reporter: martin shrekli was shrouded in a hoodie when agents arrested him at his new york apartment. the 32-year-old ceo accused of a securities trifecta of lies, deceit, and greed. >> essentially ran his companies like a ponzi scheme, where he used each subsequent company to pay off defrauded investors from the prior company. >> reporter: u.s. attorney robert capers said shkreli misled his investors, boasting in a 2011 e-mail that his hedge fund msmb, had returned 43% in just two years. in fact, the s.e.c. says,
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had virtually no assets. a second hedge fund, msmb health care, also allegedly deceived investors, and the s.e.c. says shkreli then used retrophin, a pharmaceutical company he started and took public, to pay off the mounting losses in his funds. >> he abused that power and the company assets to pay off his own personal debts. >> reporter: the charges do not include his actions at turing pharmaceuticals, where in september, shkreli brashly raised the price of daraprim, a drug that fights a rare parasitic infection, from $13.50 a pill, to $750. >> i'm a capitalist. i'm trying to create a big drug company, a successful drug company, a profitable drug company. >> reporter: as he became a symbol of drug industry greed, shkreli spent $2 million to buy the only copy of an album by the rap group wu-tang clan. we didn't seize the wu-tang clan
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shkreli left the courthouse after posting $5 million bail wearing sunglasses in a rainstorm. in all, the feds allege shkreli lost $11 million in investors' money. his arrest was trending on social media all day, frequently followed by the hashtag "karma." anthony mason, cbs news, new york. a fugitive task force is searching for a teenager in texas who gained national attention after his drunk driving conviction. as a 16-year-old, ethan couch killed four people while driving drunk, but the judge sentenced him to probation. why? his defense team claimed he was raised with affluenza, that he didn't know right from wrong because he was coddled by his rich parents. he may have violated tt probation. omar villafranca has the latest. >> reporter: exactly two weeks ago, ethan couch checked in with his probation officer, but no
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mother since. many believe the disappearance has to do with the posting of an online video that prompted an investigation by the tarrant county district attorney. this is the video that may have reignited ethan couch's legal trouble. the six-second clip tweeted at the tarrant county attorney's office earlier this month, appears to show the 18-year-old cheering during a drinking game, potentially violating his probation. now police believe he and his mother are on the run. >> when i saw the video, the first thought that crossed my mind is this is a good chance he will get locked up if he doesn't run. >> reporter: dee anderson is the tarrant county sheriff. >> not at all. i said two years ago this was going to happen. one of those times you hate to say i told you so, but i told you so. >> we need an ambulance. >> reporter: in 2013, when couch was 16, he killed four people and paralyzed a passenger in a drunk driving accident. several of the victims were helping a stranded driver.
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defense, couch's attorney argued his client suffered from affluenza, a condition of wealthy, privileged upbringing they said led to his irresponsible actions. couch was sentenced to ten years probation but no jail time. >> he hasn't learned his lesson. he won't rehabilitate or take it seriously. he never showed one ounce of remorse for killing four innocent people. >> reporter: on wednesday, the group mothers against drunk driving also expressed their frustration. ethan couch appears to show play tanlt disregard for the law, they wrote. couch's attorney confirmed the disappearance to cbs news saying, it would not be appropriate for us to publicly discuss this matter further at this time. >> i think he needs to be locked up and put into the adult court system. for the first time in his life, let's hold him accountable for what he did. >> reporter: in november, the d.a.'s office requested that couch's probation be moved over
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not happened yet. so if he's arrested, he could still only be punished in a juvenile court. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. i have asthma... ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment.
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on drugs. michael botticelli. the director of national drug control policy isn't a cop. in fact, he's lucky he wasn't locked up years ago when he was battling alcoholism. scott pelley sat down with botticelli for "60 minutes." >> a very wise judge said to me, michael, you can either get care for your drinking problem, or we can continue with criminal proceedings. >> it was at that point that you walked into this church and went to the 12-step meeting down in the basement. >> i did. >> what was that first meeting like? >> it's hard for me to talk about this, and not from a sense of sadness, but a sense of tremendous gratitude. this was the first time that i raised my hand and said that i was an alcoholic and that i had a problem. the miraculous thing about that
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addiction is such an isolating incident in your life. you feel alone. when you come into a fellowship like this, and people just surround you and say, we will help you, that you're not alone, that we have been through it before and you will get through it, just gives you such great hope. >> he's been alcohol free for 27 years. today, he oversees a $26 billion budget across 16 government agencies. just over half of the money goes to drug enforcement. what do you say to those who argue, and there are many that if you lock down the southern border, you solve the drug problem? >> i think it's overly simplistic to say that any one single strategy is going to really change the focus and change the trajectory of drug use. >> for example, he says the heroin crisis was created here at home. >> we know one of the drivers of heroin has been the misuse of
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if we're going to deal with heroin use in the united states, we really have to focus on reducing the magnitude of the prescription drug use issue. >> many pain drugs are opiods like heroin. the number of opoid prescriptions has risen from 76 million in 1991 to 207 million today. >> we have a medical community that gets little training on pain and addiction, and quite honestly, has been promoting and continues to promote the overprescribing of these pain medications. >> some are born addicted. we met botticelli at massachusetts general where dr. leslie kerzner weans infants off of opoids. >> just going to give him this little bit of morphine right in his cheek. >> in the last decade, the
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opioids has increased five fold. >> if they don't get the treatment, they could have a seizure. >> how does a person who is addicted to prescription pain medication find themselves on heroin? >> they act in similar ways and heroin is a lot cheaper on the streets. >> heroin is cheaper than prescription painkillers? >> a bag of heroin can be as cheap as $5, $10. >> more than 120 americans die of drug overdoses each day. that is more than car wrecks or gun violence. to save lives, he started an experiment in 2010 with the quincy, massachusetts police. lieutenant patrick glenn is head of narcotics. >> when someone dies of an overdose, everyone knows each other. even in a large city as ours. just recently in the past four to six months, some of our
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>> in a city of 100,000, did i understand you to say officers have lost children to drug overdoses? >> yes. >> how many? >> two. two of them lost sons. >> within what period of time? >> in the last six months. >> botticelli helped arm every quincy officer with a nasal sprayanti- antidote. >> within a minute, they started to move around and began to sit up and speak. >> must have looked like a miracle. >> it's surreal. >> and they got to the victim in time, due to a controversial innovation called the good samaritan law. one of the changes that came under botticelli's administration was that someone involved in drugs, if there was
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and they would not be arrested for having drugs on the premises. >> correct. >> what difference did that make? >> that opened the flood gates of people calling 911. >> today, 32 states have a similar 911 law. and the drug is carried by more than 800 police departments. in massachusetts, botticelli helped make treating addiction routine health care, so patients can get their opioids in a doctor's office. >> things have been going really well for you. we'll figure out the path that you can walk down for recovery. >> and today, the affordable care act requires most insurance companies to cover addiction treatment. >> i often say that substance use is one of the last diseases where we let people reach their most acute phase of this disorder before we offer intervention. you've heard the phrase hitting bottom. we don't say that with any other disorder. so the medical community has a key role in terms of identifying
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their disease, and doing a better job at treating people who have this disorder. >> notice that word, "disorder." botticelli prefers it to addiction. he wants to lift the stigma by changing the language, as he did this past october in a rally on the national mall. >> we must choose to come out in the light and be treated with dignity and respect. so let's stop whispering about this disease. >> botticelli sees a model for the change in attitude in the gay rights movement, which he has also lived. he's been with his husband, david wells, more than 20 years. at what point were you comfortable talking about being a gay man? >> umm, before i was comfortable talking about being an alcoholic. >> the alcoholism was harder? >> even kind of feeling that moment of hesitation about saying that i'm in recovery, and not about being a gay man shows
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work to do, to really destigmatize addiction. >> but it's addiction to legal drugs, alcohol and tobacco, that kill the most americans. over 500,000 a year. botticelli does not believe in adding another drug to that cocktail with the legalization of marijuana. you're not a fan? >> i'm not a fan. what we've seen, quite honestly, is a dramatic decrease in the perception of risk among youth around occasional marijuana use. and they're getting the message that because it's legal, there's no harm associated with it. so we know about 1 in 9 people who use marijuana become addicted to marijuana. it's been associated with poor academic performance, in exacerbating mental health conditions, linked to lower iq. marijuana industry is quickly
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in the '90s, tobacco companies appealed to kids with flavored cigarettes and joe camel. today, the nearly $3 billion marijuana industry promotes sweetened edibles, and buddy, a mascot for legalization. you are never going to be able to talk all the states out of the tax revenue that will come from a burgeoning marijuana industry. it will just be too seductive. >> that's quite honestly my fear is that states are going to become dependent on the revenue. >> it becomes a co-dependency. >> it becomes an addiction to unfortunately tax revenue that's often based on bad public health policy. >> as for his own recovery, he says it gets easier, though he meetings that he called miraculous. >> you can see scott's full report on our website cbsnews.com.
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a human rights lawyer is on trial in china. the charge -- posting unflattering comments about the ruling party of the country's equivalent of twitter. he faces eight years in prison. seth doane is in china with the communist crackdown on the internet. >> reporter: that lawyer is just the latest example of china cracking down on anyone who strays from the party line. and now the government is testing a new social credit
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citizens based on online behavior, just the latest in this ever expanding surveillance state. >> this is the message that got you into such trouble? >> reporter: chong iga, a former school counselor, showed us the message she reposted on social media, which cost her her job, even her home. it's incredible these few paragraphs got you into so much trouble. i was shocked, she said. our country is going backwards. the post was an apparent jab at president xi jinping. police showed up at her school to question her, and days later she was fired and forced to leave her schoolhousing. this is the 21st century, she said. why does it feel like the society with am emperor? in other countries, people can criticize, even mock leaders. we interviewed a woman who was fired because of something she posted online.
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>> not at all. i think this has a great deterrent effect and it's intended for that purpose. >> reporter: we traveled to shanghai to talk to ken about that chinese government proposal to evaluate the credit and the online behavior of citizens. it's a plan to rank citizens based on online activity. >> it's a way of compiling information down to the individual levels that can be rolled up into a score. and it talks about how well alined you are with the agenda of the leaders. >> reporter: think of it like a credit score that combines everything from shopping habits to social media posts, and can be used by the ruling communist party. >> it's a continuation of what the chinese used to do in the personal portfolio. >> reporter: that portfolio was a sort of file that could affect everything from employability to health care options. this advances that concept into
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that does not have privacy laws that prevent mass data collection. >> the information compiled could affect your ability to go to a top university. it could affect your ability to get a good job or even to get a passport to travel abroad. >> reporter: what do you think of this proposed social credit score system? the score system will probably further narrow the space for speech she told us. to say in the end. it's pretty scary. now, that social credit score system would not be rolled out for a few more years but it's apparently having a chilling effect. she was so concerned about talking with us that she set up the interview using several different cell phones and ultimately encrypted text messages.
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be right back. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources...
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and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund job placement and training for people in your community. the greatest scorer in u.s. soccer history has taker herself out of the game.
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any other player, male or female. she helped team usa win two olympic gold medals and this summer, wambach and her ammates lifted the world cup. it was the first u.s. world cup in 16 years. wambach finished her career wednesday night in new orleans. and the u.s. lost that game to china 1-0. mark strassman reports from the superdome. >> abby wambach! [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: abby wambach took the field for america one last time. a farewell to her fans and the sport she has dominated for most of this millenia. now 35, her every move was riveting, especially to all the girls watching. >> forget the medals won, the records broken, and the sacrifices made. i want to leave a legacy where the ball keeps rolling forward. >> reporter: that legacy
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olympic gold medals and one world cup victory. and this celebrated header in the 2011 world cup quarterfinal. her celebrity gave her a platform to speak her mind, even on her last day in the sport. she said she would fire the u.s. men's coach, jurgen klinsmann. >> i would definitely fire him. the way he's brought in these foreign guys is not just something i believe in. >> reporter: on the field, wambach often led with her head, but she always led with her heart. her passion as much as her power transformed the women's game and inspired a new generation of players. lindsey brought her three girls, all soccer players. >> she sees what she wants and goes after it. i want my girls to be like that. >> reporter: wambach didn't score and the u.s. lost.
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>> my next chapter is going to be even brighter, and more fulfilling, more passionate than even this is. >> reporter: as she walked off the field for the final time, this sports legend hoped that somewhere in the stands, the next abby wambach was watching. >> watch out! >> reporter: mark strassman, new orleans. >> that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm demarco morgan. a friend of the san bernardino killers has been charged with plotting other terror attacks.
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tightening security. also tonight, the anti-muslim backlash. after one of these attacks, have any of you been confronted by somebody on the street? encouraging news in the fight against ovarian cancer. he became the poster boy for drug price gouging. now martin shkreli is charged with running a ponzi scheme. and "star wars," more than a movie, it's a way of life. >> it's okay to be a geek. it's actually a good thing so i wear my fandom proudly. this is the "cbs overnight news." the first criminal charges were filed in the san bernardino terror attack. the accused is enrique marquez. he allegedly bought weapons used by syed farook and tashfeen malik to murder 14 people before
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police shootout. marquez was a longtime friend of farook, and carter evans has more. >> reporter: 24-year-old enrique marquez entered the federal courthouse in this unmarked car. he's charged with unlawful purchase of the assault rifles that were used in the san bernardino massacre and with providing material support for terrorism. in a 37-page criminal complaint, investigators say marquez had no knowledge of syed rizwan farook's plan to attack the inland regional center on december 2nd. they allege he purchased the two ar-15-style rifles for farook because his appearance was caucasian while farook looked middle eastern. investigators say marquez also purchased the eplosive smokeless power used in the pipe bombs found at the scene of the attack and in farook's home. federal investigators also detail how marquez allegedly conspired with farook to commit multiple acts of terrorism. agents say marquez admitted that he and farook initially planned
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community college in 2011. the plot targeted the cafeteria and library in an effort to inflict maximum casualties. throw pipe bombs from an elevated position and then shoot people as they fled. the complaint also said farook and marquez plotted a freeway shooting in 2012. the pair chose a stretch of state route 91 in riverside, california, where there were no exits to increase the number of targets. the alleged plan was for farook to throw bombs on the freeway to disable vehicles and stop traffic and then move among the vehicles and shoot into them. marquez would position himself on a nearby hillside so he could also shoot into vehicles and then target responding law enforcement officers. marquez is also charged with defrauding u.s. immigration services. investigators say he was paid to participate in a sham marriage with a member of farook's extended family so she could obtain legal status here in this country. scott, if marquez is convicted of all three charges, he could face up to 35 years in prison.
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breaking news tonight. carter, thank you. and president obama will be meeting in san bernardino tomorrow evening with families of the victims. 40 miles away in anaheim, disneyland is tightening security because of the threat of terrorism. disney world in florida is doing it as well. anna werner is there. >> reporter: white tents went up at disney world entrances today with metal detectors inside. park officials tell us visitors will be randomly selected for secondary screenings, a move that's similar to that used by major league sports and entertainment venues. disney officials said they've already added visible and nonvisible security measures, including more uniformed officers and specially trained dogs. once inside, guests will no longer see toy guns, not even water pistols. they've been removed from disney stores and visitors will not be allowed to bring them into the parks. one official told us they want
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doesn't cause distraction or confusion for staff and security personnel. and one more change-- anyone 14 years or older will no longer be allowed to wear costumes into the parks, so security screening will be easier. the fitzhugh family of osceola, indiana drove 20 hours straight to orlando for an all-disney vacation, arriving just as the new security protocols were being put in place. >> it's sad. i mean, it's sad that things have to happen, that go on in this world anymore. >> reporter: 16-year-old clara, a high school sophomore, says the changes make her feel better about visiting the parks. >> yeah, i do think it will be safer because, i mean, you never know people's intentions. >> reporter: disney isn't the only park making these changes. announced they're taking similar precautions. scott, they say it's not just about keeping people safe. they want people visiting the parks to feel safe.
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today, the investor who made enemies when he jacked up the price of a life-saving drug, was indicted on criminal charges. but not for gouging. prosecutors say his hedge fund was a ponzi scheme. here's anthony mason. >> reporter: martn shkreli was shrouded in a hoodie when federal agents arrested him at his new york apartment. the 32-year-old ceo accused of a securities trifecta of lies, deceit and greed. >> essentially ran his companies like a ponzi scheme, where he used each subsequent company to pay off defrauded investors from the prior company. >> reporter: u.s. attorney robert capers said shkreli misled his investors, boasting in a 2011 e-mail, that his hedge fund msmb, had returned 43% in just two years. in fact, the s.e.c. says, shkreli's fund had suffered $7 million in trading losses and
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a second hedge fund, msmb health care, also allegedly deceived investors, and the s.e.c. says shkreli then used retrophin, a pharmaceutical company he started and took public, to pay off the mounting losses in his funds. >> he abused that power and the company assets to pay off his own personal debts. >> reporter: the charges do not include his actions at turing pharmaceuticals, where in september, shkreli brashly raised the price of daraprim, a drug that fights a rare parasitic infection, from $13.50 a pill, to $750. >> i'm a capitalist. i'm trying to create a big drug company, a profitable drug company. >> reporter: as he became a symbol of drug industry greed, shkreli spent $2 million to buy the only copy of an album by the
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we didn't seize the wu-tang clan album, the fbi joked in a tweet. shkreli left the courthouse after posting $5 million bail wearing sunglasses in a rainstorm. in all, the feds allege shkreli lost $11 million in investors' money. his arrest was trending on social media all day, frequently followed by the hashtag "karma." scott. >> anthony mason, thank you, anthony. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ]
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visit worldwildlife.org. want to do something special this holiday season? support i have a dream foundation. help a child achieve the dream of a higher education. cbs cares.
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find out how you can help someone in need be a real survivor. go to donatelife.net. cbs cares. want to do something special this christmas? support i have a dream foundation. help a child achieve the dream of a higher education.
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maybe it was karma that has two cuban-americans debating immigration reform in the presidential campaign. ted cruz and marco rubio are battling to become the alternative to donald trump, and major garrett is on the campaign. >> reporter: in republican circles, the word "amnesty" is a weapon. ted cruz unleashed it against marco rubio at tuesday's debate. >> there was a battle over amnesty, and some chose, like senator rubio, to stand with barack obama and chuck schumer and support a massive amnesty plan. >> reporter: that's a reference to the 2013 immigration reform bill rubio helped draft. it ultimately failed, but the bill would have granted legal status to the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in america. cruz said today that's the definition of amnesty. >> i oppose amnesty. i oppose citizenship. i oppose legalization for illegal aliens. i always have. and i always will. >> he's not told the truth about his position in the past on
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>> reporter: rubio says cruz is forgetting the facts. cruz offered an amendment to that bill that would have provided green cards and work permits to undocumented immigrants, but deny them citizenship. >> he said at the time, and he repeated to multiple media outlets for months, that he were here illegally. >> reporter: in the crucial early state of iowa, a recent poll found 54% of gop voters wanted to deport the immigrants. iowan joel kurtinis supports cruz. >> when people hear the word "amnesty" that's an immediate yes or no for a whole lot of people. >> reporter: is that definable, amnesty? >> when you talk about allowing them to remain our turning a blind eye or winking to that, that's amnesty. >> reporter: rubio is more vulnerable on this issue than cruz because the 2013 bill also provided a path to citizenship. scott, alabama senator jeff sessions, who has guided donald trump's immigration policy said today rubio backed amnesty and cruz did not.
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major, thank you. donald trump's proposal to temporarily ban muslims entering the u.s. and the attack in san bernardino, have many of america's five million muslims defending their faith. we sat down with five muslim millennials, all born and raised right here in the united states. college student r.j. khalif. army lieutenant shahn khan. nursing student sameya omarkheil. college student taqwa brookins, and journalist noor tagouri. >> donald trump's rhetoric didn't even hit me hard until last week. i had my absolute best childhood friend, best childhood friend, since i was six years old. she lived across the street. i saw her mother as a mother. and they're white christians, and her mom on facebook posted this super hateful post about muslims.
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broke down in tears. like, i -- it was so hard for me to see. and i wrote her this long letter like, "you know us. my mom -- like, you guys know each other. i just went to your wedding last year. like i'm -- we're the muslim family that you know and you know we're not like that." >> what do you think people misunderstand about the values of islam? >> i think they believe too much that religion places an emphasis on violence. >> the koran was written in arabic, which is a deeply metaphorical language, where one word has hundreds of meanings. so if you want to define it in a violent sense, you're going to be able to define it in a violent sense, the same way if you want to define in a peaceful sense, which 1.5 billion do, you'll be able to do so. >> but there are no verses in the koran that allow killing of innocent people under no circumstances. >> terrorism in your view is outlawed? >> it's outlawed. it's the last thing any muslim should be doing. >> when you hear of an attack like the one in paris, like the one in san bernardino, and you
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go to school the next day, what's going through your mind? >> i remember after the attacks had happened, i was-- i was terrified because i knew that we would get the backlash for what had happened to all those innocent people. >> have any of you been confronted by somebody on the street? anybody have words with you? >> yeah. it was the monday after the paris attacks had happened, and i went to school. i was walking, and a man that was leaning against a parking meter, i was walking past him, and he stuck out his leg and he tripped me right in front of, you know, everybody. and i fell on to the floor. and then he threw down his cigarette, and he started screaming in my ear, like on the right side. he was just like, "go back to where you came from." >> he didn't mean long island? >> that's what i thought he meant, you know. that's where i'm from. i've never felt hate like that before, so it was the first time for me. >> lieutenant, when you decided to join the army, was there a lot of conversation in the family about that? >> everyone that wasn't in the military was like, you know, are
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own people? this is crazy. what are you doing?" that's when i did my own research and i found out there's plenty of muslims serving in the military. there's religious tolerance. there's respect. >> i wonder how it strikes your ear when you hear isis in particular, claiming that it's doing everything that it's doing in the name of all muslims. >> i don't understand how logically does it make sense to say that, you know, isis represents all muslims and is fighting for all muslims when they're killing the very people who they claim they represent. >> there's nothing islamic about isis. islam, it comes from the root word salam, three arabic letters that literally translates to peace. isis goes against the very tenets of it. >> to see more of this eye-opening discussion, go to cbsnews.com. you can also find us, of course,
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secretary of defense ashton carter said today that americans will be seeing more buildup of u.s. forces in the fight against isis. carter's interview in iraq today with charlie d'agata was his first since the secretary acknowledged using a personal e- mail account to conduct official business, which is against federal rules. >> what i did, that i shouldn't have been doing until a few months ago, was occasionally use my iphone to send administrative messages, no classified information, and backed up as records. i have to hold myself to absolutely strict standards in terms of cyber security, and doing things that are appropriate. i didn't in this case. it's a mistake. and it's entirely my own. >> reporter: we've just returned from syria. we spoke to commanders there. and they said they don't need training and equipment. we need heavy artillery,
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we need antitank weapons to match the firepower against isis. is that under discussion? >> yes. we've acknowledged that we're doing that, and we're doing that because they're effective fighters, and that's exact the kind of partner we're looking for. >> reporter: they suggested to us there may even be the introduction of more forces. >> absolutely. president obama wants us to accelerate the defeat of isil. so he is open to-- and i've made it clear to my commanders-- i want to get this done both in iraq and syria. >> reporter: americans might be concerned when they hear about more equipment, more involvement, more troops. >> they are going to hear about us doing more because we need to defeat isil and we need to do it quickly. so we need to enable capable and motivated local forces-- that's our strategic approach. have them with our active help. >> reporter: are you winning or is it containment? >> we'll win. i don't have any question about it, but we want to win faster,
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>> reporter: a big part of the problem is getting baghdad on board, scott. the secretary of defense failed to get the iraqi government to accept more u.s. help. it doesn't play well at home that america is doing their bidding for them. >> charlie d'agata with the news-making interview tonight. charlie, thank you. a simple test can detect an elusive and deadly cancer among women. nasa discovers celestial light- sabers. and new "star wars" movie is we've been changing things up with k-y love. oh yeah. it's a pleasure gel that magnifies both our sensations. it gives us chills in places we've never gotten chills before. yeah, it makes us feel like...
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it's estimated more than 14,000 women in the u.s. will die this year from ovarian cancer, a disease that often goes undiscovered. but dr. jon lapook tells us a new test is showing promise. >> reporter: more than 21,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, usually too late to be cured. that's because early symptoms are either absent or vague. for the first time, a large study suggests there may be a way to successfully screen women for this disease and save lives. more than 200,000 women in great britain were followed for 11 years and doctors used a new strategy for screening. women were first given a series of blood tests called ca125.
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upward suspiciously, women were then given a pelvic ultrasound. this resulted in a 15% lower chance of dying from ovarian cancer. no previous strategy has been effective. this is encouraging, but the researchers caution these women will need to be followed for about another three years before it's clear whether this new method actually works. but, scott, given that right now there's really been no effective way of screening for such a deadly cancer, this is promising. >> jon lapook, thank you, doctor. coming up next, a special
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we'll be right back.
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pope francis turned 79. at the vatican children sang happy birthday in his native spanish and presented him with a cake with a single candle. also getting a birthday cake, this one made of ice, raisins, peanut butter and trail mix is coldilocks, the polar bear at the philadelphia zoo just turned 35, the oldest polar bear in the lower 48. and as if on cue today, nasa revealed an image captured by the hubble space telescope that looks a lot like a light saber from "star wars." it's actually a newborn star shooting out twin jets of super- heated gas. it is not in a galaxy far, far away, but in our own, the milky way.
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"star wars." every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coaster a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. a healthy baby is worth the wait. o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag.
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we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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star wars! star wars! >> they're already in line. the new "star wars" movie opens at midnight. for some fans, "star wars" is not just a couple of hours of fantasy. it is part of their everyday reality. here's mireya villarreal. >> he's a big, fat, caterpillar. >> reporter: jennifer landa is a california-based wife and mother who loves to play with her daughter. start talking about "star wars" and it's like the force awakens. >> i think when i was younger it was definitely more of a secret, but now it's okay to be a geek. it's actually a good thing, so i wear my fandom proudly. >> reporter: there's her artwork, her costume collection, and just look at her wedding photos.
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more subtly. >> reporter: you say "subtle" but i've seen your pictures. >> this is true. that is the one thing where i just like the movie, darth vader, with stormtroopers at my side. it was awesome. >> reporter: near san francisco, 70-year-old steve sansweet runs rancho obiwan, a nonprofit museum that, according to the "guinness book of world records" holds the largest "star wars" collection at 500,000 items that date back to the first movie in 1977. >> the politics were so dark in america, the vietnam war, the impeachment of richard nixon, the movies were dark, and here came something really fresh. >> reporter: every year, until 2020, a new "star wars" movie is set to be released. >> i think it is safe to say that "star wars" is forever. >> reporter: keeping fans like sansweet and landa collecting,
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>> feels good, right. >> reporter: it kind of does. >> yeah! >> reporter: mireya villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us just little bit later for the morning news and of course, "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
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news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. president obama insists we have nothing to fear from terrorists this holiday season, but the people who run america's theme parks aren't taking any chances. the disney mark parks in california and florida are all ramping up security. and it includes more metal detectors, random screening of visitors and a ban on some kids anna werner has more. >> reporter: white tents went up with metal detectors inside. park officials tell us visitors will be randomly selected for secondary screenings, a move that's similar to that used by major league sports and entertainment venues. disney officials said they've already added visible and nonvisible security measures, including more uniformed officers and specially trained dogs. once inside, guests will no longer see toy guns, not even water pistols.
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stores and visitors will not be allowed to bring them into the parks. one official told us they want to make sure that a toy gun doesn't cause distraction or confusion for staff and security personnel. and one more change-- anyone 14 years or older will no longer be allowed to wear costumes into the parks, so security screening will be easier. the fitzhugh family of osceola, indiana drove 20 hours straight to orlando for an all-disney vacation, arriving just as the new security protocols were being put in place. >> it's sad. i mean, it's sad that things have to happen, that go on in this world anymore. >> reporter: 16-year-old clara, a high school sophomore, says the changes make her feel better about visiting the parks. >> yeah, i do think it will be safer because, i mean, you never know people's intentions. >> reporter: disney isn't the only park making these changes. universal and sea world also announced they're making similar changes.
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people safe. anna werner, cbs news, orlando. social media is buzzing with glee over the arrest of martin shrekli, the hedge fund manager that jacked up the price of a life-saving drug. shrekli faces up to 20 years in do with price gouging. anthony mason reports. >> reporter: martin shrekli was shrouded in a hoodie when agents arrested him at his new york apartment. the 32-year-old ceo accused of a securities trifecta of lies,dy seat, and greed. >> essentially ran his companies like a ponzi scheme, where he used each subsequent company to pay off defrauded investors from the prior company. >> reporter: u.s. attorney robert capers said shkreli misled his investors, boasting in a 2011 e-mail that his hedge fund msmb, had returned 43% in just two years. in fact, the s.e.c. says,
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million in trading losses and had virtually no assets. a second hedge fund, msmb health care, also allegedly deceived investors, and the s.e.c. says shkreli then used retrophin, a pharmaceutical company he started and took public, to pay off the mounting losses in his funds. company assets to pay off his own personal debts. >> reporter: the charges do not include his actions at turing pharmaceuticals, where in september, shkreli brashly raised the price of daraprim, a drug that fights a rare parasitic infection, from $13.50 a pill, to $750. >> i'm a capitalist. i'm trying to create a big drug company, a profitable drug company. >> reporter: as he became a symbol of drug industry greed, shkreli spent $2 million to buy the only copy of an album by the rap group wu-tang clan. we didn't seize the wu-tang clan
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shkreli left the courthouse after posting $5 million bail wearing sunglasses in a rainstorm. in all, the feds allege shkreli lost $11 million in investors' money. his arrest was trending on social media all day, frequently followed by the hashtag "karma." anthony mason, clbs news, new york. a task force is searching for a teenager in texas who gained attention for drunk driving. the judge sentenced him to probation. why? his defense team claimed he was raised with affluenza, that he didn't know right from wrong because he was coddled by his rich parents. he may have violated that probation probation. omar villafranca has the latest. >> reporter: exactly two weeks ago, ethan couch checked in with his probation officer, but no
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mother since. many believe it has to do with the posting of an online video that prompted an investigation by the district attorney. this is the video that may have reignited ethan couch's legal trouble. the six-second clip tweeted at the terrent county attorney's office, appears to show the 18-year-old cheering during a drinking game, potentially violating his probation. now police believe he and his mother are on the run. >> when i saw the video, the first thought that crossed my mind is this is a good chance he will get locked up if he doesn't run. >> reporter: does this surprise you? >> not at all. i said two years ago this was going to happen. one of those times you hate to say i told you so, but i told you so. >> reporter: in 2013, when couch was 16, he killed four people and paralyzed a passenger in a drunk driving accident. several of the victims were
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as part of a controversial defense, couch's attorney argued his client suffered from affluenza, a condition of privileged upbringing that led to his irresponsible actions. couch was sentenced to ten years probation but no jail time. >> he hasn't learned his lesson. he won't rehabilitate or take it seriously. he never showed one ounce of remorse for killing four innocent people. >> reporter: on wednesday, the group mothers against drunk driving also expressed their frustration. couch's attorney confirmed the disappearance to cbs news saying, it would not be appropriate for us to publicly discuss this matter further at this time. >> i think he needs to be locked up and put into the adult court system. for the first time in his life, let's hold him accountable for what he did. >> reporter: in november, the d.a.'s office requested that
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to an adult court, but that has not happened yet. so if he's arrested, he could juvenile court. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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the united states has a new and unlikely leader in the war on drugs. the director of national drug control policy isn't a cop. in fact, he's lucky he wasn't locked up years ago when he was battling alcoholism. scott pelley sat down with him. >> a very wise judge said to me, michael, you can either get care for your drinking problem, or we proceedings. >> it was at that point that you walked into this church and went to the 12-step meeting down in the basement this >> what was that first meeting like? >> it's hard for me to talk about this, and not from a sense of sadness, but a sense of tremendous gratitude. this was the first time that i raised my hand and said that i was an alcoholic and that i had a problem.
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is people rally around you. adig00 is such an isolating incident. you feel alone. when you come into a fellowship like this, and people just surround you and say, we will help you, that you're not alone, that we have been through it before and you will get through hope. >> he's been alcohol free for 27 years. today, he oversees a $26 billion budget across 16 government agencies. just over half of the money goes to drug enforcement. what do you say to those who argue, and there are many that if you lock down the southern border, you solve the drug problem? >> i think it's overly simplistic to say that any one single strategy is going to really change the focus and change the trajectory of drug use. >> for example, he says the heroin crisis was created here at home.
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heroin has been the misuse of pain medication. if we're going to deal with heroin use in the united states, we have to focus reducing the prescription drug abuse issue. >> the number of opoid prescriptions has risen from 76 million in 1991 to 207 million today. >> we have a medical community that gets little training on pain and addiction, and quite honestly, has been promoting and continues to promote the overprescribing of these pain medications. >> some are born addicted. we met bodachelli at massachusetts general. >> just going to give him this little bit of morphine right in his cheek.
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number of expecttant mothers on opoids has increased five fold. how does a person addicted to prescription pain medication find themselves on heroin? >> they act in similar ways and heroin is a lot cheaper on the streets. >> it's cheaper than painkillers? >> a bag of heroin can be as cheap as $5, $10. >> more than 120 americans die of drug overdoses each day. to save lives, he started an experiment in 2010 with the quincy, massachusetts police. lieutenant patrick glenn is head of narcotics. >> when someone dies of an overdose, everyone knows each other. even in a large city as ours.
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to six months, some of our officers have lost children. >> in a city of 100,000, did i understand you to say officers have lost children to drug overdoses? >> yes. >> how many? >> two. >> within what period of time? >> in the last six months. >> he helped arm every office we are a nasal spray antidote. >> within a minute, they started to move around and began to sit up and speak. >> must have looked like a miracle. >> it's surreal. >> and they got to the victim in time, due to a controversial innovation called the good samaritan law. one of the changes that came under the administration was that someone involved in drugs, if there was an overdose, they
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not be arrested for having drugs on the premises. >> correct. >> what difference did that make? >> that opened the flood gates of people calling 911. >> today, 32 states have a similar 911 law. and the drug is carried by more than 800 police departments. in massachusetts, bodachelly helped make treating addiction routine health care, so patients can get their opoids in a doctor's office. and today, the affordable care act requires most insurance companies to cover addiction treatment. >> i often say that substance use is one of the last diseases where we let people reach their most acute phase of this disorder before we offer intervention. you've heard the phrase hitting bottom. we don't say that with any other disorder. so the medical community has a
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people in the early stages of their disease, and doing a better job at treating people who have this disorder. >> notice that word, "disorder." he prefers it to addiction. he wants to lift the stigma by changing the language, as he did this past october in a rally on the national mall. >> we must choose to come out in the light and be treated with dignity and respect. so let's stop whispering about this disease. >> he sees a model for the change in attitude in the gay rights movement, which he has also lived. he's been with his husband, david wells, more than 20 years. at what point were you comfortable talking about being a gay man? >> umm, before i was comfortable talking about being an alcoholic. >> the alcoholism was harder? >> even kind of feeling that moment of hesitation about
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not about being a gay man shows to me that we still have more work to do, to really destigmatize addiction. >> but it's addiction to legal drugs, alcohol and tobacco, that kill the most americans. over 500,000 a year. he does not believe in adding another drug to that cocktail with the legalization of marijuana. you're not a fan? >> i'm not a fan. what we've seen, quite honestly, is a dramatic decrease in the perception of risk among youth around occasional marijuana use. and they're getting the message that because it's legal, there's no harm associated with it. so we know about 1 in 9 people who use marijuana because addicted to marijuana. it's been associated with poor academic performance, in exacerbating mental health conditions, linked to lower iq. >> he worries the marijuana industry is quickly adapting big tobacco
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in the '90s, tobacco companies flavorif catered to kids with flavored cigarettes and joe camel. you are never going to be able to talk all the states out of the tax revenue that will come from a burgeoning marijuana industry. it will just be too seductive. >> that's quite honestly my fear is that states are going to become dependent on the revenue. >> it becomes a co-dependency. >> it becomes an addiction to tax revenue based on bad public health policy. >> as for his own recovery, he says it gets easier, though he still attends those 12-step meetings that he called miraculous. >> you can see scott's full report [cough, cough] mike? janet? cough if you can hear me. don't even think about it.
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call this number now. our clothes can stretch out in the wash, ruining them forever. protect your clothes from stretching, fading, and fuzz. ...with downy fabric conditioner... it helps protect clothes from the damage of the wash. so your favorite clothes stay your favorite clothes. downy fabric conditioner. wash in the wow. a human rights lawyer is on trial in china. the charge -- posting unflattering comments about the ruling party of the country's equivalent of twitter. he faces eight years in prison. seth doane is in china with the communist crackdown on the internet. >> reporter: that lawyer is just the latest example of china cracking down on anyone who strays from the party line.
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testing a new social credit score system, which would rank citizens based on online behavior, just the latest in this ever expanding surveillance state. >> this is the message that got you into such trouble? >> reporter: john iga, a former school counselor, showed us the message she reposted on social media, which cost her her job, even home. it's incredible these few paragraphs got you into so much trouble. i was shocked, she said. our country is going backwards. the post was an apparent jab at president xi jinping. this is the 21st century, she said. why does it feel like the society with am emperor? in other countries, people can
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we interviewed a woman who was fired because of something she posted online. are you surprised by that? >> not at all. this has a great deterrent effect and that's the purpose. >> reporter: we talked to him about that chinese government proposal to rank citizens based on their online activity. >> it's a way of compiling information down to the individual levels that can be rolled up into a score. >> reporter: think of it like a credit score that combines everything from shopping habits to social media posts, and can be used by the ruling communist party. >> it's a continuation of what the chinese used to do in the personal portfolio. >> reporter: that was a sort of file which could affect everything from employability to health care options.
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the digital age, in a country that does not have privacy laws that prevent mass data collection. >> the information compiled could affect your ability to go to a top university. it could affect your ability to get a good job or even to get a passport to travel abackboard. >> reporter: what do you think of this proposed social credit score system? the score system will probably further narrow the space for speech she told us. it's pretty scary. now, that social credit score system would not be rolled out for a few more years but it's apparently having a chilling effect. she was so concerned about talking with us that she set up the interview using several different cell phones and embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid.
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want to do something special this holiday season? support i have a dream foundation. help a child achieve the dream of a higher education. cbs cares. organ donation can truly provide a second chance at life. find out how you can help someone in need be a real survivor. go to donatelife.net. cbs cares. want to do something special this christmas? support i have a dream foundation. help a child achieve the dream of a higher education. cbs cares. >> the greatest scorer in
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herself out of the game. abby wambach has more goals in international competition than any other player, male or female. she helped team usa win two olympic gold medals and this summer, wambach and her teammates lifted the world cup. it was the first u.s. world cup in 16 years. wambach finished her career wednesday night in new orleans. and the u.s. lost that game to china 1-0. mark strassman reports from the superdome. >> reporter: abby wambach took the field for america one last time. a farewell to her fans and the sport she has dominated for most of this millenia. now 35, her every move was riveteding, especially to all the girls watching. >> forget the medals won, the records broken, and the sacrifices made. i want to leave a legacy where
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>> reporter: that legacy included 184 career goals, two olympic gold medals and one world cup victory. and this celebrated header in the 2011 world cup quarterfinal. the celebrity gave her a platform to speak her mind, even on her last day in the sport. she said she would fire the u.s. men's coach, jergen clensman. >> i would definitely fire him. the way he's brought in these foreign guys is not just something i believe in. >> reporter: on the field, wambach often led with her head, but she always led with her heart. her passion to wrap??? a faster way to wrap gifts, after 4- 30! three girls, all soccer players. >> i want my girls to be like that.
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but it didn't matter. >> my next chapter is going to be even brighter, and more fulfilling, more passionate than even this is. >> reporter: as she walked off the field for the final time, this sports legend hoped that somewhere in the stands, the next abby wambach was watching. >> watch out! orleans. >> that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm demarco morgan. captioning funded by cbs
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